Search Results for “Rudolph Valentino

RUDOLPH VALENTINO, NATASHA RAMBOVA (1926)

[New York: International Newsreel,1926]. Vintage original 8 1/2 x 6 1/2″ (22 x 17 cm.) black-and-white print still photo, VERY GOOD+.

Photo of Rudy Valentino kissing his then-wife Natasha Rambova. At the time when this photo was issued they were now divorced, and he was fighting for his life.

RUDOLPH VALENTINO, ALBERTO D’ANTONGUOLLA and NATASHA RAMBOVA (ca. 1923)

New York: Underwood and Underwood, [ca. 1923]. Vintage original 10 x 8″ (25 x 20 cm.) black-and-white print still photo, stamp of photographer Underwood and Underwood on verso, NEAR FINE.

A portrait of Rudy Valentino with his brother Alberto d’Antonguolla and his then-wife Natasha Rambova.

Rudolph Valentino – An Icon To This Day

Walter Film has acquired a collection of vintage original studio photographs of Rudolph Valentino from Four Horsemen Of The Apocalypse (1921), Camille (1921) with Alla Nazimova (1921), A Sainted Devil (1924) See Image Above, The Son Of The Sheik (1926) and a hand tinted lobby card from the film that made him an international star, The Sheik (1921).

RUDOLPH VALENTINO / A SAINTED DEVIL (1924)

[Hollywood: Paramount Pictures, 1924]. Vintage original 10 x 8″ (25 x 20 cm.) borderless black-and-white print still photo, very minor wear at edges, NEAR FINE. An appropriately shouldering image of Rudolph Valentino as a Spanish nobleman.

ALLA NAZIMOVA, RUDOLPH VALENTINO / CAMILLE (1921)

[Hollywood: Metro Pictures, 1921]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) double weight matte finish photo, FINE.

Alla Nazimova and Rudolph Valentino as the star-crossed lovers in this silent film adapted from Alexandre Dumas’ La Dame aux Camélias (The Lady with the Camellias). After his breakthrough the year before in THE FOUR HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE, Valentino was by now on the edge of stardom, and his next film — THE SHEIK — would cement his ascendance in the world of film.

Photos from this film are very scarce, especially in this double weight format.

RUDOLPH VALENTINO / THE FOUR HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE (1921)

[Hollywood: Metro Pictures, 1921] Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) sepia-tinted double weight matte print still photo, USA. Rudolph Valentino, Alice Terry, Alan Hale, Nigel De Brulier, Wallace Beery, Jean Hersholt, dir: Rex Ingram; Metro.

The film which made Rudolph Valentino a legend. It earned ten million dollars during its initial release ($300 million in today’s dollars) and is famous for the torrid tango scene, but the film is much more. It is the story of the devastation of the Great War (having just ended in 1918) on the people of Argentina. The film was masterfully directed by Ingram (who would marry the leading lady Alice Terry at end of filming). Valentino paid for much of his wardrobe used in the film, and made so little money for his role that he spent the next year paying off his wardrobe bill. Fortunately he would soon be paid better. To this day, this is one of the most visually stunning of all American silent films. It was placed on the National Film Registry in 1995.

This portrait of Valentino in his dance costume as character Julio Desnoyers is exquisite.  It is coded “37”.  Brown tape remnant on verso, FINE.

RUDOLPH VALENTINO / SON OF THE SHEIK (1926) with Vilma Bánky

[Hollywood: United Artists, 1926] Vintage original 9 x 10″ (22.8 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Rudolph Valentino, Vilma Banky, George Fawcette, Montagu Love, Karl Dane, dir: George Fitzmaurice; United Artists.

Sequel film to THE SHEIK, which would be Rudolph Valentino’s last film. He plays a dual role, as both the Sheik and his son. As the son he ravages dancing girl Vilma Banky in his tent palace, and much of the adventurous action is played for fun. Banky’s father and gang do not care for what is going on in the lover’s lair, so they capture and torture Valentino. One of the first “sequel” films to be made, it is also one of the first to be released after a star’s death.  Sets by William Cameron Menzies.

In perhaps the most famous scene from the film, Valentino tears open his costume to reveal his torture wounds to Vilma Banky.  Photo is coded “V-3-1-94”. Stamped by photographer Nealson Smith on verso. FINE.

RUDOLPH VALENTINO / SON OF THE SHEIK (1926) Close-up photo

[Hollywood: United Artists, 1926] Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Rudolph Valentino, Vilma Banky, George Fawcette, Montagu Love, Karl Dane, dir: George Fitzmaurice; United Artists.

Sequel film to THE SHEIK, which would be Rudolph Valentino’s last film. He plays a dual role, as both the Sheik and his son. As the son he ravages dancing girl Vilma Banky in his tent palace, and much of the adventurous action is played for fun. Banky’s father and gang do not care for what is going on in the lover’s lair, so they capture and torture Valentino. One of the first “sequel” films to be made, it is also one of the first to be released after a star’s death.  Sets by William Cameron Menzies.

Valentino smolders while holding a cigarette in this close-up image coded “V-3-1A70”. Stamped by photographer Nealson Smith on verso. FINE.

RUDOLPH VALENTINO / SON OF THE SHEIK (1926) Full-length photo

[Hollywood] United Artists, 1926. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black and white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Rudolph Valentino, Vilma Banky, George Fawcette, Montagu Love, Karl Dane, dir: George Fitzmaurice; United Artists.

Sequel film to THE SHEIK which would be Rudolph Valentino’s last film. He plays a dual role, as both the Sheik and his son. As the son he ravages dancing girl Vilma Banky in his tent palace, and much of the adventurous action is played for fun. Banky’s father and gang do not care for what is going on in the lover’s lair, so they capture and torture Valentino. One of the first “sequel” films to be made, it is also one of the first to be released after a star’s death.  Sets by William Cameron Menzies.

Valentino as Ahmed the Sheik in this full-length character shot takes a striking pose. Photo is coded “V-3-7”. Stamped by photographer Nealson Smith on verso, a one-inch tear at top border near right corner, ABOUT FINE.

HOLLYWOOD STARS SANTA MONICA BEACH PARTY INCLUDING RUDOLPH VALENTINO (1926)

 Vintage original 7 ½ x 9 1/2” (19 x 24 cm.) silver gelatin sepia tinted still photo print, USA> According to the original attached publicity blurb dated June 19, 1926, the eclectic group of the movie industry’s elite this was a party which Richard Barthelmess was giving which he moved to Constance Talmadge’s Santa Monica beach house. The gathering includes Rudolph Valentino who would die two months later while on tour in New York City. According to sources though, this gathering was for Richard Barthelmess’ May 1926 birthday party and was at the home of Natalie Talmadge (Mrs. Buster Keaton). At any rate, the home appears to have been owned by one of the Talmadge sisters. Constance Talmadge had a home into the 1930s with an address of 1020 Beach Road (now Pacific Coast Highway) and that may be the address at which this party took place. The image fortunately comes with a copy pointing out the celebrities in attendance and most of the original International Newsreel Photo Los Angeles Bureau paper “slug.” Attendees include: Fatty Arbuckle, Mae Murray, Virginia Vallie, Claire Windsor, Ronald Coleman, Bessie Love, Constance Talmadge, Jack Pickford, Rudolph Valentino, Pola Negri, Agnes Ayres, Howard Hughes, Blanche Sweet, Norma Talmadge, Beatrice Lilly, Richard Barthelmess, Edmund Goulding, Carmel Myers, Antonio Moreno, and Louella Parsons. Quite a historic piece. Photo is sepia toned. There are chips to all four corners. Crease at lower left corner. Borders may have been trimmed,. Number written in pen near top right corner. VERY GOOD.

RUDOLPH VALENTINO / THE SON OF THE SHEIK (1926)

Vintage original 10 x 8” (25 x 20 cm.) black and white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Rudolph Valentino, Vilma Banky, George Fawcett, Montagu Love, Karl Dane, Agnes Ayres, dir: George Fitzmaurice; United Artists. Sequel film to THE SHEIK and Valentino’s last film. He plays a dual role, as both the Sheik, and his son. This time, as the son he ravages dancing girl Vilma Banky in his tent palace, and much of the adventurous action is played for fun. Banky’s father and gang do not care for what is going on in the lovers’ lair, so they capture and torture Valentino, as in this scene. One of the first “sequel” films to be made, it is also one of the first to be released after a stars death. A smoldering portrait of Rudolph Valentino in perhaps his best remembered role. The still is coded V-3-2-16. Slight creasing along top blank white border. ABOUT FINE.

RUDOLPH VALENTINO / THE SHEIK (1921) Lobby card

Vintage original 11 x 14″ (28 x 35 cm.) lobby card, USA. Rudolph Valentino, Agnes Ayres, Ruth Miller, George Waggner, Adolph Menjou, dir: George Melford, Paramount. A legendary and iconic film, the ultimate romantic melodrama.

A free thinking British woman is abducted by an Arab sheik who has become infatuated with her when she visits the Sahara desert. He takes her to his desert tent castle and seduces the reluctant beauty. Only when she is kidnapped by desert bandits does she realize she has fallen in love with him, and he is to her rescue!

This film made Rudolph Valentino a star and the image of him as The Sheik is now iconic. He appears on this card in his most famous costumes with leading lady Agnes Ayres. Interestingly, his future wife, Natasha Rambova, appears as an extra, as do three sisters who would become stars — Sally Blane, Polly Ann Young, and Loretta Young. Border art includes line art of “The Sheik” carrying his lady across the desert while being pursued by bandits. There is one single neat closed pinhole in each corner, FINE.

RUDOLPH VALENTINO / THE FOUR HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE (1921)

Vintage original 10 x 8″ (25 x 20 cm.) black-and-white double weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Rudolph Valentino, Alice Terry, Alan Hale, Nigel De Brulier, Wallace Beery, Jean Hersholt, dir: Rex Ingram; Metro. The film which made Rudolph Valentino a legend. It earned ten million dollars during it’s initial release ($300 million in today’s dollars) and is famous for the torrid tango scene, but the film is much more. It is the story of the devastation of the Great War (having just ended in 1918) on the people of Argentina.
The film was masterfully directed by Ingram (who would marry leading lady Alice Terry at the end of filming). Valentino paid for much of his wardrobe used in the film, and made so little money for his role that he spent the next year paying off his wardrobe bill. Fortunately he would soon be paid better. To this day, this is one of the most visually stunning of all American silent films. It was placed on the National Film Registry in 1995.
This profile portrait of Valentino in his dance costume as character Julio Desnoyers is very rare and photographed by Evans, LA. Flawless. FINE.

HOLLYWOOD STARS AT SANTA MONICA BEACH (1926) Richard Barthelmess, Rudy Valentino, Fatty Arbuckle

[Santa Monica] 1926. Vintage original  7 1/2 by 9 3/4″ (19 x 24 cm.) sepia-tinted silver gelatin double weight print still photo, FINE.

According to a print found with an attached paper blurb dated June 19, 1926, this image of eclectic Hollywood elite was taken for Richard Barthelmess’ birthday party at the Santa Monica beach home of Constance Talmadge. Other sources say that is was at the beach home of her sister Natalie Talmadge (Mrs. Buster Keaton). Both had homes at the beach at the time; Constance’s home was at 1020 Beach Road (now Pacific Coast Highway).

Barthelmess’ birthday fell in May and he had gathered an interesting group, including Rudolph Valentino (who would die just a few months later while on tour in New York City); Beatrice Lillie (in town to make a rare film appearance in EXIT LAUGHING) and Fatty Arbuckle (still part of the crowd though working only in uncredited bits).

Those in the photo are:

Top row: Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle, Mae Murray, Ward Crane, Virginia Valli, Ronald Colman, Bessie Love, Jack Pickford, Rudolph Valentino, Pola Negri;

Middle row: Maitland Rice, Chris Goulding, Louella Parsons, Lila Lee, Carmel Myers, Alan Forest, Bert Lytell, Claire Windsor, Richard Barthelmess, Constance Talmadge, Beatrice Lillie, Al Hall, Dorothy Dalton, Mrs. John Robertson, Helen Ferguson, Agnes Ayres, John Robertson, Mrs. Talmadge, Marquis Henry de La Falaise, Marshall Neilan, Howard Hughes, unknown;

Bottom row (sitting): Antonio Moreno, Prince David Mdivani, Charles Lane, Edmund Goulding, Henry D’Arcy, unknown, Harry d’Arrast, Doris Deau, Mae McAvoy, Eddie Kane, Natalie Talmadge, Daisy Canfield Danziger, unknown, Alastair Mackintosh, Kittie Scalla and Blanche Sweet. There are no condition issues.

JULIAN ELTINGE / COUSIN LUCY (1915)

[New York, 1915]. Vintage original borderless 12 1/2 x 8 3/4″ (32 x 22 cm.) black-and-white print still photo, trimmed for publication, with tears reinforced with tape, and stickers of an old photo agency on verso. An ink hologram note on back reads “Julian Eltinge Cousin Lucy Cohan Theatre”. Photo shows signs of handling, GOOD.

COUSIN LUCY was a show with music by Jerome Kern. Julian Eltinge was the most famous female impersonator of his time.

“After appearing in the Boston Cadets Revue at the age of ten in feminine garb, Eltinge garnered notice from other producers and made his first appearance on Broadway in 1904. As his star began to rise, he appeared in Vaudeville and toured Europe and the United States, even giving a command performance before King Edward VII. Eltinge appeared in a series of musical comedies written specifically for his talents starting in 1910 with The Fascinating Widow, returning to Vaudeville in 1918. His popularity soon earned him the moniker “Mr. Lillian Russell” for the popular beauty and musical comedy star.

“Hollywood beckoned Eltinge and in 1917 he appeared in his first feature film, The Countess Charming. This led to other films, including 1918’s The Isle of Love with Rudolph Valentino and Virginia Rappe. By the time Eltinge arrived in Hollywood, he was considered one of the highest paid actors on the American stage; but with the arrival of the Great Depression and the death of Vaudeville, Eltinge’s star began to fade. He continued his show in nightclubs but found little success. He died in 1941 following a show at a New York City nightclub.” (Wikipedia)

Shooting The Stars – The Golden Age of Hollywood Portraiture

Hollywood Portrait Photography came into existence at the beginning of the 20th Century, following the relocation of the film industry from the east coast to Hollywood. These fledgling studios needed to create interest in their motion pictures by promoting the actors who stared in them. From 1910 – 1970, there[…]