Search Results for “Judy Garland

JUDY GARLAND FILMS “MINNIE FROM TRINIDAD” | ZIEGFELD GIRL (1941) BTS photo

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1941]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white double weight matte finish silver gelatin photo. Fine.

Under the direction of Busby Berkeley and the camera work of Ray June, Judy Garland reacts with effervescent charisma for her close-up in this spectacular musical number. Judy and the dancers awaiting their cue are all dressed by Adrian. Production ink stamp of 1165×65 on verso.

JUDY GARLAND WITH HER MOTHER (1941) Photo

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1941]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white double weight matte photo. Production number ink stamp on verso, fine. The relationship between Judy Garland and her mother was truly complicated. The stage mother gave her daughter the drive and the brain wiring to be a[…]

JUDY GARLAND | THE WIZARD OF OZ (1938) Oversized portrait by László Willinger

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1938]. Vintage original 10 x 13″ (25 x 32 cm.) black-and-white double weight matte finish print photo. Some overall minor creases including across Judy’s lip and cheek area. Tiny creases at corner edges and repaired tear to blank white margin at bottom middle area. Some minor soil on top background. Near fine.

A stunning portrait from one of Judy Garland’s most famous sittings. This and other portraits from the sitting were those which Judy kept with her and signed while filming The Wizard of Oz between Sep. 1938 and Mar. 1939. While filming the Munchkinland sequence in Dec. 1938, Judy signed a similar portrait for each of the Munchkins as well as to her other Oz cast and crew mates.

Photo features ink stamp of photographer László Willinger.

JUDY GARLAND, LIZA MINNELLI PERFORM “TWO LOST SOULS” | THE JUDY GARLAND SHOW (1963) TV photo

[Los Angeles: CBS Television, 1963]. Vintage original 7 x 9″ (17 x 22 cm.) black-and-white glossy silver gelatin print photo. Crease at top right corner, about fine.

Judy Garland and Liza Minnelli display their versatility in song, dance and comedy in the final number to episode #8 of The Judy Garland Show. The show was the third to be taped in July of 1963. The show broadcast as number 8 on Nov. 17, 1963. Liza would return to perform on Judy’s Christmas show a month later.

Liza surely demonstrated the tricks of the trade she had learned from her mother, keeping up with her in a routine that had its basis in Judy’s movie and stage tramp number, “A Couple of Swells”. The Adler and Ross song “Two Lost Souls” from Damn Yankees was substituted. This TV still from CBS includes the original wraparound attached paper blurb and a Nov. 15, 1963, ink stamp from the Cleveland Press.

JUDY GARLAND, LIZA MINNELLI FUNNY ANTICS | THE JUDY GARLAND SHOW (1963) TV photo

[Los Angeles: CBS, 1963]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white glossy silver gelatin print photo. Scratch at top left edge, about fine.

When Judy Garland asked daughter Liza Minnelli to co-star with her on episode #8 of her television series, Liza was asked to display her wide array of talents in dance, singing and comedy. She was up to the challenge and dueted with her superstar mom, including on this musical comedy duet “Two Lost Souls”. Judy appears to be quite verklempt at Liza’s performance here.

Magazine usage ink stamp form on verso as well as inventory number. Photo is borderless.

JUDY GARLAND, LIZA MINNELLI TAKE A BOW | THE JUDY GARLAND SHOW (1963) TV photo

[Los Angeles: CBS Television, 1963]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white glossy silver gelatin print photo. Significant crease at bottom right corner, very good.

For taped episode #3 (in July of 1963) which became the #8 episode aired on Nov. 17, 1963, Judy Garland welcomed daughter Liza Minnelli as her main guest. The mother/daughter duo performed several numbers together, including a recreation of Judy’s popular tramp number, this time to the song “Two Lost Souls”, as appropriate to the character as the original song “A Couple of Swells”.

Here they take a bow at the end of the performance. Original magazine ink stamp usage form on the verso and handwritten notes.

JUDY GARLAND TV SPECIAL CARICATURE (1962) Photo

[New York: CBS Television, 1962]. Vintage original 7 x 9″ (17 x 22 cm.) black-and-white glossy silver gelatin print photo. Creases at bottom right corner and along the top of the photo as well as a tiny edge tear at top. Near fine.

Judy Garland was on a huge resurgence. Told she should not work again after a health scare in 1959, she rallied and spent five years at the top of her game with 5 movies, concerts in Europe, numerous record albums, nightclubs and Vegas, and the grand Carnegie Hall concert and tour of 32 cities which led to interest from TV networks.

Two specials led to her having her own TV series. The first was this,  which was filmed before a live audience in Burbank, CA. The first half of the show featured Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra as her guests; the second half was a mini version of her Carnegie Hall concert. Presented by CBS, it was a huge success.

Caricatures such as this appeared in TV magazines and newspapers. Two original CBS paper blurbs are attached.

JUDY GARLAND | EVERYBODY SING (1938) Portrait

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1938]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white glossy silver gelatin print photo. Minor crease at top right corner, near fine.

Judy Garland at 15 displays a lovely smile for this portrait used to promote her move to star status. When MGM bought the rights to The Wizard of Oz in late 1937, it was bought to make Garland a star. In preparation for over a year before it went before the cameras, Judy was rushed through three films.

The first was a vehicle to move her from the character/juvenile classification to the star roster at MGM. Originally called The Ugly Duckling (to which mother Billie Burke refers to in the script), it was retitled Everybody Sing. Judy sang — a lot — but so did everyone else. As Oz was being prepared and she tested various hair, costume and make-ups, she finished this film as well as Love Finds Andy Hardy and Listen, Darling. This portrait was used all through 1938 to promote those films.

There is a date stamp on the verso of Nov. 28, 1938.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) BTS Judy Garland plays with Toto

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin photo. Fine.

The MGM set photographer captured Judy Garland in a series of photos with her co-star Terry (as Toto) in which they played together while waiting to film their next scene. Garland became so close to Terry that she asked if she could buy her but the dog, which appeared in many films, was too valuable to her trainer. 

Photo includes its original attached paper blurb, printed text and ink code stamp on verso. Photo is coded “1060 X 49”.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) BTS Judy Garland scolds Toto

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin photo. Fine. 

While between takes on the OZ sound stage, the set photographer shot a series of photos with Judy Garland and her co-star Terry (as Toto) which were used for pre-release publicity. This is one of the most charming. 

The photo includes its original paper blurb, printed text and ink code stamp on verso. Photo is coded “1060 x 40”. 

JUDY GARLAND & MICKEY ROONEY MUSICALS (1939-40) Set of 2 publicity photos

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939] Set of two (2) vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin photos. Fine.

With THE WIZARD OF OZ and four other films during the 1939-40 season, Judy Garland achieved a place on the box office top ten roster for 1940. These included the Busby Berkeley-directed BABES IN ARMS (they are seen with Douglas McPhail and Betty Jaynes) and STRIKE UP THE BAND. 

Both photos feature their attached paper blurbs and printed text on verso. Stills are coded “1088-117” and “S1141-143” with minor edge wear.

JUDY GARLAND FASHION (1940) Publicity photo

[Los Angeles, 1940] Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin photo. Minor wear. About fine.

Under the studio system, stars were obligated to endlessly pose for publicity, including fashion shots such as these. Garland merchandised her own line of clothes, as well as toy, doll and book items. She even had a flower shop on Wilshire Blvd. in Los Angeles, and this photo was taken near that location. 

Paper blurb, printed text and ink code on verso.

JUDY GARLAND’S 17th BIRTHDAY PARTY (1939) Publicity photo

[Los Angeles, 1939] Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin photo. Fine.

Garland and her family moved into 1231 Stone Canyon Road while still working on THE WIZARD OF OZ. Though the original paper and printed text blurbs say that this party was for her 16th birthday, it was really her 17th birthday in June 1939. She is seen dancing in her living room with co-star Mickey Rooney. 

Paper blurb, printed blurb and code ink stamp on verso. Still is coded “1088 x 48”.

JUDY GARLAND AT HOME (1939) Set of 2 publicity photos

[Los Angeles, 1939] Set of two (2) vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin photos. Fine.

The golden year of Hollywood film is 1939, and it was Judy Garland’s golden year as well. She reached star status, had her hand and footprints and signature placed at Grauman’s, won an Academy Award and with just her $500-per-week salary was able to have famed architect Wallace Neff design and build her a Bel-Air home on Stone Canyon Road with her own separate bedroom suite. The house stands nearly unchanged to this day. 

The photo of her relaxing in her suite has not been seen before. The other shows her in the backyard of the estate which included a tennis court and swimming pool. Both include their original attached paper blurbs and studio printed text. Stills are coded “5364”and “5375”.

JUDY GARLAND | A STAR IS BORN (1954) Record store display poster

[New York]: Columbia Records, [1954]. Vintage original 12 x 26″ (30 x 67 cm.) tri-folded poster. Overall minor edge wear, a bit more at top right side and mid left side and at fold creases, very good.  

This poster is for record store display for the 1954 Columbia Records first release of this historic film soundtrack. Judy Garland recorded exclusively for Decca Records between 1936-1946. Her home film studio, MGM, asked her to give up that contract when they started releasing soundtracks in 1946. Though some of the Decca output included her movie songs, she was able to branch out in many styles and perform record-only songs for Decca. 

Though she continued that career path on radio, it was not until leaving MGM and creating her own stage show that she then went back to her recording career. In 1953 she signed a contract with Columbia Records, recorded four sides of pop songs and then embarked on the challenge of making her musical film version of A Star Is Born. As she was signed with Columbia for recordings, they made a deal with Warner Brothers to release a soundtrack album in 1954. It was released in 33 rpm and in a box set of 78 rpm records. It reached fourth place on the Billboard chart when first released.

Judy Garland @ 100

A major moment of movie memorable as well as an important birthday for one very famous female vocalist happened this year. Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm on the 10th of June 1922) turned 100.  In honor of her centennial birthday, celebrations have taken place across the United States and at Garland-loving locations around the world.

JUDY GARLAND (1941) Set of 5 photos

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1941]. Collection of five (5) vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photos. Overall signs of light handling, including scattered creases, very good or better.

This group of images, each with paper blurb with a sequence number, relates to MGM biography and production photos used to tell Judy Garland’s life story in a movie magazine publication. Some have the information typed on the verso, too, and several have publication ink stamps and studio photo ink stamps on verso. One has sizing marks on the front.

Included are images of her as a baby, as a child in vaudeville, and in her early MGM film roles.

JUDY GARLAND | FOR ME AND MY GAL (1942) Photo

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1942]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo. Wear and small tear at top left corner, minor edge wear, near fine.

Judy Garland poses in a lovely lace gown which was designed for her by Robert Kalloch and used on much of the publicity and poster art (though not in the film).

JUDY GARLAND, MICKEY ROONEY | STRIKE UP THE BAND (1940) Photo

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer], 1940. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo. Edge and corner wear. A semi-circle was added above the two heads for printing purposes. Very good.

The second of the grand Garland-Rooney extravaganza musicals. There were Academy Award nominations in a competitive year.

This image was used extensively for PR (including for a one sheet poster). Original paper blurb on verso indicates this print as being used to advertise the 10-28-40 broadcast of the radio play version of the film. Coded #1141-147, pencil note of “107” at top right corner.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Judy Garland wears bedroom slippers

The Wizard of Oz is the most recognized film of all time. Its status is legendary and any original ephemera of 1939 is a collectors’ and archivists’ gold. From L. Frank Baum’s popular children’s classic, the film referring to the book opens with the title “For nearly forty years this story has given faithful service to the Young in Heart; and Time has been powerless to put its kindly philosophy out of fashion.” For 80 plus years since, the movie has become beloved by new generations who still find this message true. The brilliant cast members each became film legends for the characters they portrayed. Celebrating a new year, we present a fine array of original 1939 production stills for your consideration.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) [Hollywood]: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white double weight glossy silver nitrate photo print, FINE. Judy Garland, Frank Morgan, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr, Billie Burke, Margaret Hamilton, dir: Victor Fleming; MGM.

In this original studio release double weight photo with printed text, advertising approval ink stamp and photo number ink stamp (“1060-86”) present on verso, we spot Judy Garland as Dorothy wearing her rehearsal booties instead of the ruby slippers as she and Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow observe Jack Haley’s Tin Man dance. Minor waver at bottom right margin.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Judy Garland and Ray Bolger meet Jack Haley

The Wizard of Oz is the most recognized film of all time. Its status is legendary and any original ephemera of 1939 is a collectors’ and archivists’ gold. From L. Frank Baum’s popular children’s classic, the film referring to the book opens with the title “For nearly forty years this story has given faithful service to the Young in Heart; and Time has been powerless to put its kindly philosophy out of fashion.” For 80 plus years since, the movie has become beloved by new generations who still find this message true. The brilliant cast members each became film legends for the characters they portrayed. Celebrating a new year, we present a fine array of original 1939 production stills for your consideration.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) [Hollywood]: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver nitrate photo print, ABOUT FINE. Judy Garland, Frank Morgan, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr, Billie Burke, Margaret Hamilton, dir: Victor Fleming; MGM.

A superb image of Judy Garland as Dorothy and Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow meeting Jack Haley as the Tin Man. This early release photo stamped “July 1939” was utilized for newspaper use prior to the film’s Aug. 15 premiere and release. Original ACME paper blurb on verso along with photographer and dated department stamps. Minor crease at top right corner.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Judy Garland and the Munchkins

The Wizard of Oz is the most recognized film of all time. Its status is legendary and any original ephemera of 1939 is a collectors’ and archivists’ gold. From L. Frank Baum’s popular children’s classic, the film referring to the book opens with the title “For nearly forty years this story has given faithful service to the Young in Heart; and Time has been powerless to put its kindly philosophy out of fashion.” For 80 plus years since, the movie has become beloved by new generations who still find this message true. The brilliant cast members each became film legends for the characters they portrayed. Celebrating a new year, we present a fine array of original 1939 production stills for your consideration.

Wizard of Oz, The (1939) [Hollywood]: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver nitrate photo print, USA. Judy Garland, Frank Morgan, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr, Billie Burke, Margaret Hamilton, dir: Victor Fleming; MGM.

Judy Garland as Dorothy is welcomed in musical recitative to Munchkinland by the Munchkins when her Kansas house lands on the Wicked Witch of the East, rendering her dead. With its original typed paper blurb lightly attached on the verso in near mint condition, coded “1060-12”.  This image, used for a 1939 lobby card, is the only still photo of this scene, FINE.

JUDY GARLAND SHOW, THE (1963-64)

The Judy Garland Show [Hollywood] CBS, 1963. Vintage original 7 x 9″ (17 x 22 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Judy Garland, dir: George Schlatter, CBS.

With her phenomenal concert success, billboard charted records, Grammys, film work with an Academy Award nomination and TV specials, Judy was ready for her own television series in 1963. There was one season, but to this day it represents the finest of the musical variety television format including iconic moments.

This photo advertised the broadcast of the first show in Sept. 1963, FINE.

JUDY GARLAND | I COULD GO ON SINGING (1963) Set of 2 UK photos

I Could Go On Singing (1963) [England] United Artists (1963) Set of two (2) vintage original 10 1/2 x 13 1/2″ (26 x 34 cm.) single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photos, UK. Judy Garland, Dirk Bogarde, dir: Ronald Neame, United Artists.

Riding the wave of another surge in her success due to epic concert touring, Judy again returned to filmmaking in the early-1960s. Venturing to England to work on this semi-autobiographical film, Judy performed as she did live at the famed Palladium.

In these two images she performs the title song. FINE.

JUDY GARLAND, MICKEY ROONEY, SHIRLEY TEMPLE at MGM (1941)

Vintage original 8 x 10” (20 x 25 cm.) black and white, single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Judy Garland, Mickey Rooney, Shirley Temple; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. For a brief period, Shirley Temple joined the MGM star roster. Having left Twentieth Century Fox in spring 1940 so as she could go to school and have a more normal life, she was bored with non-movie making life within a year. In spring of 1941 her mother signed a contract with MGM and Shirley was assigned to the Freed unit to do a big musical with Mickey and Judy. The film was BABES ON BROADWAY. Mrs. Temple, however, was not ready to allow Shirley to be a co-star, and feared that the duo would outshine Shirley, hence she took her out of the film and a starring vehicle, KATHLEEN, was instead assigned to Shirley. It did poorly and the Temples left MGM. Upon her arrival though, Mickey and Judy showed her around the studio. Photo has several border and corner tears and creases, all of which have been tape repaired on the verso. VERY GOOD-FINE.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Judy Garland and Ray Bolger

Vintage original 8 x 10” (20 x 25 cm.) black and white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Judy Garland, Frank Morgan, Hamilton, Billie Burke, dir: Victor Fleming; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Amongst the first scenes to be filmed under the director’s hand of Victor Fleming was Dorothy’s meeting of the Scarecrow in the cornfield on the way to the Emerald City. Some months before this Oct. 1938 meeting, Judy and Ray went through the same paces on a much different set under the direction of Richard Thorpe. The footage was unsatisfactory and scrapped. George Cukor took over for a while and both characters costume and make up were greatly changed. Fleming oversaw the reconstruction of the set! Months after this, when an additional musical number was decided upon, in April 1939, this set was reconstructed and Garland and Bolger went through more paces Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr, Margaret under Busby Berkeley’s hand. That footage was completely cut, though found some 50 years later. This is still 1060-60. The slight sepia toned photo has a crease at the top left corner and archival tape has been used to re-enforce. A tear at mid margin right has been repaired and tape has pulled a bit of border emulsion and bit of the paper from the verso. Copyright, 1939 Loew’s, Inc. and title information along the bottom margin. VERY GOOD-FINE.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Judy Garland and the Munchkins

Vintage original 8 x 10” (20 x 25 cm.) black and white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Judy Garland, Frank Morgan, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr, Margaret Hamilton, Billie Burke, dir: Victor Fleming; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. So rare and coveted are any original promotional items from this classic film which has become part of the American psyche. This still, 1060-23 is one of the few to feature Judy Garland as Dorothy with the Munchkins, here she intently listens to the words of the Mayor of Munchkin City as played by Charles Becker. This photo has been well used. There are tears and creases along the left margin which have been re-enforced with archival tape on the verso. There are creases at the corners and soling to the borders. Copyright, 1939 Loew’s, Inc. and title information along the bottom margin. One of the very few images which feature Judy in her “farm girl” shoes rather than the ruby slippers. VERY GOOD.

ZIEGFELD GIRL (1941) Judy Garland and Lana Turner

Vintage original 10 x 8” (25 x 20 cm.) black and white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Judy Garland, Lana Turner, Hedy Lamarr, James Stewart, dir: Robert Z. Leonard; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Lana Turner and Judy Garland pose for a publicity still on the Ziegfeld Follies backstage rehearsal set. The story of three girls in show business and the different paths their lives take is an archetype which has been played out in many variations. The film was in development since 1938 and was to originally star a combination of MGM top female stars of the time including Eleanor Powell, Joan Crawford, Virginia Bruce and Margaret Sullavan. However, by 1940, the script was developed for the new reigning female stars. Garland and Turner first worked together in 1938 when Turner was brought into MGM by her mentor Mervyn Le Roy. The two co-starred in LOVE FINDS ANDY HARDY and became good friends, and remained so even when Turner eloped with Garland’s crush Artie Shaw. The two appear to be sharing confidential information in photo coded 1165-173. Slight soil to the blank white margins. ABOUT FINE.

JUDY GARLAND / BROADWAY MELODY OF 1938 (1937) by Clarence Sinclair Bull

Vintage original 10 x 8” (25 x 20 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Robert Taylor, Eleanor Powell, George Murphy, Sophie Tucker, Buddy Ebsen, Judy Garland, dir: Roy Del Ruth; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

From March through July of 1937, Judy Garland was working on her first MGM feature production, BROADWAY MELODY OF 1937. She had appeared in several shorts for MGM and a feature at Twentieth Century Fox in 1936. Though she had signed with MGM in 1935, the studio was not sure what to do with her initially and groomed her slowly. Most of her first year was spent doing radio appearances so as audiences would become accustomed to the mature voice the 13 year-old possessed. She signed a contract with Decca records on her own at the time.

When, in Feb. 1937 she sang a special version of the song “You Made Me Love You” to Clark Gable at his studio birthday party, executives felt that the piece was so outstanding that she needed to perform it in a feature — thus, the role of Betty Clayton was created for the new Eleanor Powell-starring vehicle. The film was renamed BROADWAY MELODY OF 1938 and publicized as being so NEW that it was a year ahead of its time!

To promote her new feature, Garland at age 15 posed for a variety of portraits for famed photographer C.S. Bull. His ink stamp is on the verso as is a date of July 7, 1937, and pencil notations for magazine use. Another ink date stamp of Jun 18, 1969, is also present for another publishing, which was just 4 days before her death.

Shows signs of use including light crop markings on the image, and light creasing at the four corners. Scratch to emulsion on piano music stand, VERY GOOD-FINE.

JUDY GARLAND / STRIKE UP THE BAND (1940) Glamour portrait

Vintage original 8 x 10” (20 x 25 cm.) black and white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Judy Garland, Mickey Rooney, Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra, June Preisser, dir: Busby Berkeley: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Judy Garland was allowed a bit more glamour with each new film, including those in which she played the girl next door to Mickey Rooney. Judy turned 18 during production and not long after was engaged to be married. This was a story of High School Seniors who form a jazz band and win a big competition put on by Paul Whiteman. Slight creases at corners only. ABOUT FINE.

JUDY GARLAND | EVERYBODY SING (1938) Photo

Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Judy Garland, Billie Burke, Fanny Brice, Allan Jones, Reginald Owen, dir: Edwin L. Marin; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Still is coded 1020-13 and has minimal edge wear, about fine.

When in late-1937 MGM acquired the rights to The Wizard of Oz, with the intent of it being a vehicle for their rising musical star Judy Garland, the star-making machinery went into fast action. Featured in several films prior, the studio created this lower budget musical for her, sent her on a US personal tour, announced her casting in Oz in Feb. 1938, moved her to star status on their roster and set the script and music writers to their task of turning L. Frank Baum’s fantasy book into a musical. There were months of pre-production and so long did it take that Garland finished two more films before starting Oz.

This story, initially titled The Ugly Duckling, gave Judy great comic and dramatic moments as well as songs in the form of ballad, swing and minstrel — utilizing all her grand talents. Here she is with leading lady Lynn Carver, who plays her sister.

JUDY GARLAND | I COULD GO ON SINGING (1963) Performing “It Never Was You”

Vintage original 9 x 7″ (23 x 18 cm.) borderless single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Judy Garland, Dirk Bogarde, Jack Klugman, Aline MacMahon, Gregory Phillips, dir: Ronald Neame; United Artists. A very fine glossy print, fine.

Judy Garland’s satisfying swan song film. Originally titled (and released in Europe) as The Lonely Stage, both titles were appropriate for Garland. Essentially a soap opera, nowadays it is seen as a glossy 1960s drama in the style of The V.I.P.s and similar ’60s films.

Even today, the acting by both Garland and Dirk Bogarde (and the supports) is considered superb and the musical interludes, spell binding. Most of Garland’s concert performance work in the film was shot at the actual London Palladium, the scene of several record-breaking concert engagements by Garland. A mock-up of the Palladium stage was erected at Shepperton Studios for some of her songs and this still is for one of those.

Here she performs, with just a pianist (David Lee), the beautiful Kurt Weill/Maxwell Anderson song “It Never Was You”. Garland is framed in light on the stage, an iconic image of the beloved lady. Bob Willoughby is credited with the still photography on this film. It is coded LS (1317)-3 on the front.

SATURDAY NIGHT AT THE BATHS (1975) Set of 7 photos

[New York: Buckley Brothers Films, 1975]. Set of seven (7) vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white photos. Some scattered staple holes, overall near fine.

An exceedingly scarce set of photos from this gay American feature film. Parish 213: “Set at the Continental Baths, New York City’s (in)famous gay bath house, the low-budget feature was co-produced by Steve Ostrow the club’s owner who plays himself in this independent release… A highlight… is the cabaret scenes… where female impersonators cavort as Shirley Bassey, Judy Garland, Carmen Miranda and Diana Ross” (one of these photos depicts a performer in the cabaret).

The film, which had a small theatrical release, had a basically sex-positive vibe, and it is a relic from a period of gay liberation, long before the AIDS catastrophe hit.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Dorothy and the Wicked Witch

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939]. Vintage original 7 x 9″ (17 x 22 cm.) black-and-white glossy silver gelatin photo. Minor wear on blank white margins, creases at bottom right corner. Near fine.

Rare are images of Margaret Hamilton as the Wicked Witch of the West. The first three weeks of filming under Richard Thorpe included the scenes in the Witch’s castle. Though Hamilton and Judy Garland had completely different scene appearances, there were a number of stills taken used for the film’s publicity campaign. When the scenes were reshot a few months later for the final version, only a few still photos were taken. This is the absolute best, showing how menacing the Witch is to Dorothy and providing a true horror aspect to the fantasy film.

Original attached printed paper blurb dated 7/6/39 is on verso. A N.E.A. ink stamp is dated 7/13/39, as well as an original newspaper release ink stamping. This photo was issued before the film’s Aug. 1939 release, to pre-publicize the coming film. Size is original format as issued.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Meeting the Cowardly Lion

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white glossy silver gelatin photo. Very minor wear, fine.

This iconic image of the story’s four main characters was used to publicize the film, including on an original release lobby card. Though there is not a trace of it here, during filming Judy Garland (Dorothy) could not stop laughing at how funny Bert Lahr was as the Cowardly Lion. In the final film, however, there is a hint of her amusement. With Jack Haley as the Tin Man and Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow.

Photo is coded 1060-97.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Dorothy and the Scarecrow meet the Tin Man

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white glossy silver gelatin photo. Very minor corner wear, fine.

Dorothy (Judy Garland) and the Scarecrow (Ray Bolger) meet the Tin Man (Jack Haley). This set was fully realized on an MGM soundstage. Haley replaced Buddy Ebsen in the role, and though Ebsen pre-recorded the songs (and his vocals remain in the final film on some of the group numbers), he did not film this scene. Photos from this sequence often show Judy wearing flat slippers to appear shorter, but here she wears the iconic ruby slippers.

Photo is coded 1060-83.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Dorothy meets the Scarecrow (#1060-52)

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white glossy silver gelatin photo. Photo coded 1060-52. Very minor wear at the corners, fine.

Oz was in pre-production for at least a year before cameras turned. When they did in the fall of 1938, the first scene filmed was that in the cornfield, and under director Richard Thorpe. Three weeks later the footage and appearance was deemed unacceptable by the powers of MGM. The set was completely revamped, and the appearances of Judy Garland and Ray Bolger were re-conceptualized as well. Two directors came and went, and on Oct. 31, 1938, Judy and Ray again met in the cornfield to commence another 5 months of filming.

This was one of the earliest photos taken for these days of filming. Here Garland’s hair braids are long; at the end of production, portions of this scene would be filmed again and Judy’s braids would be a different length. The final film includes footage from both filming sessions.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Dorothy rides in Munchkin carriage

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white glossy silver gelatin photo. Minor emulsion rub at top blank white margin only, fine.

Dorothy (Judy Garland) and Toto (Terry) are presented to the Munchkin community riding in a miniature carriage. This special carriage was designed and built by Cedric Gibbons and his team, and all of the set props and pieces were executed on the MGM lot. This carriage was featured in displays when the film was premiered in various theatres and was recently re-discovered.

Photo is coded 1060-122.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Dorothy meets Glinda and the Munchkins

[Los Angeles]: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white glossy silver gelatin photo. Fine.

A rare long shot image which shows much of the Munchkin Land set. This set was built entirely on an MGM soundstage. There were no special effects or matte paintings employed and therefore an encompassing image could be taken for still photography. MGM may also have held back on advertising the vast spectacle so audiences would be amazed by the fantasy when seeing the film for the first time. Billie Burke musically introduces Judy Garland to the Munchkins.

Photo is coded 1060-53. There is a vintage 1939 clipping on the verso giving the title, production number, cast (including character actors not given screen credit and only in 1939 press materials) and directing credit.

A beautiful original photo.

LIZA MINNELLI, VINCENTE MINNELLI ON RMS QUEEN ELIZABETH (1951) Photo

[Los Angeles: 1951]. Vintage original 7 x 9″ (17 x 22 cm.) black-and-white glossy silver gelatin print photo. Minor waviness, more prominent at mid-left and right side edges. Tape stains along the top blank white margin, very good.

Unusual at the time, Vincente Minnelli’s separation and eventual divorce from Judy Garland stipulated joint custody of daughter Liza. Here, Vincente leaves the 5-year-old child on RMS Queen Elizabeth to venture to London on her own (chaperoned) to stay with her mother, who was playing a series of concerts for several months at the London Palladium. This was Judy’s triumphant return after leaving MGM the year before. Liza was quite the world traveler starting at an early age.

Original stamps for the Brooklyn Eagle Index Dept., along with the tearsheet from the newspaper in which it was printed (also ink date stamped July 8, 1951). Photo printed specifically for newspaper use.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Publicity group shot

[Los Angeles: MGM, 1939]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) glossy silver gelatin sepia-tinted photo. With 1939 Loew’s Inc copyright at lower left, bottom edge is well worn along blank white margin as is some of the right-side margin, with two areas of emulsion missing in blank white margin and creasing at top right corner. Very good.

Judy Garland, Bert Lahr, Jack Haley and Ray Bolger in their career-defining roles create a spooked scenario as they pose for a publicity photo. This and other photos of this type were taken near the end of principal photography on Feb. 25, 1939. The Kansas sequences were being filmed under King Vidor’s direction and would continue into March.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Tin Man dance scene still

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin photo. Fine.

Judy Garland and Ray Bolger as Dorothy and the Scarecrow assist Jack Haley as the Tin Man in his dance as he laments his fate of being rusted. 

Photo includes Loews copyright on front bottom margin and includes its original attached paper blurb, printed text and ink code stamp on verso. Photo is coded “1060-84”. 

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Characters in Winkie costumes

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939]. Vintage original 7.5 x 9.5″ (18 x 23 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin print still photo, USA. Judy Garland, Frank Morgan, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr, Billie Burke, Margaret Hamilton, dir: Victor Fleming. Possibly lightly trimmed for publication, near fine.

Bert Lahr, Jack Haley and Ray Bolger are dressed as the Wicked Witch’s Winkie guards as they rescue Dorothy from the witch’s castle.

Still is coded. “106-100”. Original paper blurb on verso.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Tin Man in forest

[Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939]. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white single weight glossy silver gelatin photo. About fine.

Judy Garland is featured with co-stars Ray Bolger and Jack Haley in their respective iconic roles in the scene where Dorothy and the Scarecrow first meet the Tin Man. 

Still is coded “1060-77”. 

M-G-M’S STUDIO BOSS AND HIS TOP TALENT (1943) Oversize photo

[Hollywood: MGM, 1943]. Vintage original 16 x 20″ (41 x 51 cm.) oversize black-and-white print still photo, slight rippling and creasing at edges, near fine.

A collective portrait of MGM’s enormous star roster in 1943, which includes Katharine Hepburn (seated next to studio head Louis Mayer), Lucille Ball, Hedi Lamarr, James Stewart, Spencer Tracy, and many others. Descriptive text at bottom gives the names of everyone in the photo.

It also lists actors missing because they were touring military camps during World War II (Lana Turner, Judy Garland, and others) and four actors who were now on active duty in the armed forces (including Clark Gable).

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) Full-length portrait of Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow

The Wizard of Oz is the most recognized film of all time. Its status is legendary and any original ephemera of 1939 is a collectors’ and archivists’ gold. From L. Frank Baum’s popular children’s classic, the film referring to the book opens with the title “For nearly forty years this story has given faithful service to the Young in Heart; and Time has been powerless to put its kindly philosophy out of fashion.” For 80 plus years since, the movie has become beloved by new generations who still find this message true. The brilliant cast members each became film legends for the characters they portrayed. Celebrating a new year, we present a fine array of original 1939 production stills for your consideration.

WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939) [Hollywood]: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939. Vintage original 8 x 10″ (20 x 25 cm.) black-and-white double weight glossy silver nitrate photo print, FINE. Judy Garland, Frank Morgan, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr, Billie Burke, Margaret Hamilton, dir: Victor Fleming; MGM.

Full length shot of Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow used for the film’s publicity art. The date stamp of “Feb. 9, 1939” indicates this was released early on to be used for the ad department’s renderings for newspaper and magazine print ads. The printed typed blurb also appears on the verso. The photo number ink stamp of “106–144” also appears. Remnants of an attached paper blurb are also present.

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